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Training Deliberately: Seeking Feedback to Hone Your Game

A factory had stopped completely. Management puzzled over what caused it — was there a glitch in their system they couldn’t see? The factory had all their best people on the case, but they couldn’t figure out how everything shut down. They brought in someone from the outside to have a look.

She showed up and identified the problem within a few minutes. She gave a knob a quarter of a turn, and everything in the factory lit up and went back online. The factory managers were thrilled to get back up and running so quickly. They weren’t so happy when they got her bill for ten thousand dollars.

They confronted her about it. All she did was turn a knob. It took her two seconds to find it and turn it.  Anybody could do that. Why should they have to pay so much for something so simple? They demanded she itemize it for them.  She did so gladly. 

The invoice simply read, “Turning the knob: $1. Knowing which knob to turn: $9,999.00.”

We’ve heard this parable a million different ways, but the lesson it illustrates is timeless. Expertise always proves its value. Expertise is worth paying for.

Finding the right coach to flip that switch

A good coach is an expert that can get you up and running. Training has highs and lows. We all experience times where what was once a groove has now become a rut. What used to work shut down and won’t start up again.

If that’s happening to you right now, congratulations.  You’re at the beginning of a big learning curve. To help get through the rut, lean into your coaches and your training partners. A coach that finds the right switch to hit can help your rut – and your game – immensely.

A great coach focuses on your progress — on what you need to better your game. A great coach will identify what works for you, and they’ll help you explore new moves to test out. They are committed to developing you and your journey. However, depending on what you need, an elite athlete or competitor may not always make the best coach for you.

Renzo Gracie black belt John Danaher, widely regarded as the best instructor in BJJ, revolutionized teaching Jiu Jitsu by systematizing effective methods. He has also never competed.

If you want to compete and win, then you can’t get much better than a coach focused on the same thing. Easton is flush with champions and coaches who understand how to win competition, and they want nothing more than to see you on the podium.

Think about your goals and how a coach can help you crush them. Then think about which coach would best fit you and your specific needs.

[Martial Arts: Starting from Zero]

Teaching styles matter

Different coaches have different ways of teaching the same material. Consider what styles of teaching you respond to best.

Some coaches can tap into a specific wavelength for us in ways others may not. We’ve all had a coach in our practice who knows how to speak to us to make a technique work where it didn’t before. Also, the coach we need at a competition may not be the same coach we need for experimenting, developing a new method or introducing new aspects to our game.

One of the biggest perks to being a student at Easton includes the wealth of opportunities to visit other academies and meet other coaches.  We have so many options to learn from and train with all over the metro. Take advantage of it. It’s a huge privilege most academies don’t enjoy. Training shows us how we learn best and which methods help us learn most.

If you decide to look to a coach for insight or a private lesson, think about why some teaching methods or coaches work better for you. What makes that style of coaching work?

Are you the athlete that needs motivation?

Are you a student that needs conceptual understanding?

Are you a competitor that needs methods and drills to cement tactics?

Are you the person that needs help outlining strategies to execute?

There are lots of options for coaching available today, including many online resources. These can make great tools to study, and we can learn something we may not otherwise regularly see. There might be a specialist who can show you what you’ve been missing. As Easton students, we have access to numerous classes, teammates and coaches for private or group lessons to elevate your game specifically.

We all stagnate. We all get in a rut, or our game just needs a jolt of new creativity. Sometimes we don’t know what knob needs to be turned or valve that needs adjusting. A good coach that gets you can be a big help. If you feel like your game needs a nudge, just ask a coach. They are way more than happy to trouble shoot things with you. 

Curious about Jiu Jitsu or Muay Thai? Try a free class today!

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